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    • Cancer Care

    Guide to Cancer Screenings

    One of the most crucial aspects of maintaining health and wellness is staying proactive about regular cancer screenings. Early cancer detection significantly increases the chances of successful treatment and survival. The multidisciplinary care team at the William N. Pennington Cancer Institute at Renown Health provides compassionate care and support to the community for early detection and diagnoses. This comprehensive guide outlines the various cancer screenings available for breast, colorectal, lung, cervical, prostate and skin cancer. Breast Cancer Screening Who Should Get Screened? Mammograms are recommended starting age 40 for those considered at average risk for breast cancer. Women with a family history or other risk factors should discuss appropriate screening options with their healthcare provider. Women under 40 with a family history should discuss risk factors with a healthcare provider. Screening Methods Mammogram: This provides an X-ray of the breast and can detect tumors that are not yet palpable. Breast MRI: This type of scan is recommended for women at high risk for breast cancer due to genetic factors or family history. Screening Breast Ultrasound: This scan can help in identifying masses in denser breast tissue that might not be visible on mammogram. It is recommended in addition to a mammogram for patients at a higher risk for breast cancer. What to Expect During a mammogram, the breast is compressed between two plates to capture X-ray images. Some pressure or discomfort may be felt, but the procedure is brief and critical for early detection. Colorectal Cancer Screening Who Should Get Screened? Adults aged 45 to 75 should undergo regular colorectal screenings. Some adults under 45 may need to be screened earlier depending on family history or other genetic risks. Those over 75 should consult with their healthcare provider to determine if continued screening is necessary. Screening Methods Colonoscopy: This procedure uses a flexible tube with a camera to examine the entire colon. Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT): A non-invasive test that detects hidden blood in the stool. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy): Uses Computed tomography (CT) imaging to provide detailed views of the colon. What to Expect A colonoscopy can detect changes or abnormalities in the large intestine (colon) and rectum. Screening is usually advised every ten years, but if you are at risk, screening may be recommended every 3 to 5 years after your initial colonoscopy. Colonoscopy preparation includes bowel cleansing the day before and sedation during the procedure. FIT is a simple at-home test requiring no special preparation. Lung Cancer Screening Who Should Get Screened? Adults aged 50 to 80 with a significant smoking history (20 pack years or more) and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. Screening Methods Low-dose Computed Tomography (LDCT): A CT scan with low radiation doses to create detailed images of the lungs. What to Expect LDCT is a non-invasive scan that requires you to hold your breath for a few seconds. Cervical Cancer Screening Who Should Get Screened? Women aged 21 to 65 should undergo regular screenings. Women aged 21 to 29 should have a Pap test every three years. Women aged 30 to 65 should have a Pap test and HPV test every five years, or a Pap test alone every three years. Screening Methods Pap Test (sometimes called a Pap Smear): Collects cells from the cervix to detect precancers. HPV Test: Identifies high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types that can cause cervical cancer. What to Expect The Pap test involves collecting cells from the cervix using a small brush. Some discomfort may be felt, but the procedure is brief and crucial for early detection. Prostate Cancer Screening Who Should Get Screened? Men aged 50 and older should discuss screening options with their healthcare provider. Men at higher risk (African American men and those with a family history of prostate cancer or are a BRCA2 gene carrier) should begin discussing screenings  at age 40. Screening Methods Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test: Measures PSA levels in the blood. Digital Rectal Exam (DRE): A physical examination where the provider feels the prostate through the rectum to detect abnormalities. What to Expect The PSA test is a simple blood test. The DRE may cause slight discomfort but is quick and essential for early detection. Skin Cancer Screening Who Should Get Screened? Anyone with a suspicious lesion or abnormal area on their skin. Individuals with more than 50 moles or dysplastic moles. Those with a personal history of melanoma or history of other skin cancers. Those who have more than one member of immediate family with a history of cancers (melanoma, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer) or a family member who was diagnosed with melanoma before they were 50 years old. Positive gene testing for BRACA2, Lynch syndrome genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2 or EPCAM). Screening Methods Skin Exam: A visual examination by your provider to check for unusual moles, birthmarks, or other skin changes. Biopsy: Removal of a small sample of skin for testing if an abnormal area is identified. What to Expect A skin exam is non-invasive and visual. A biopsy involves minor discomfort and local anesthesia if needed. Expert Advice Although the cadence of these skin screenings may or may not be annual, as one's age increases, the risk of many cancers rises. Everyone benefits from attentive sun protection, including avoiding direct sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. by seeking shade and wearing hats, clothing and sunscreen. When purchasing sunscreen, look for SPF 50, UVA/UVB broad spectrum. Questions to Discuss with Your Healthcare Provider What is my risk level for different types of cancer? Which screening tests do you recommend for me and why? What are the potential risks and benefits of each test? How often should I get screened? What steps to follow if a test result is abnormal? Importance of Cancer Screenings Regular cancer screenings are vital for maintaining your health and catching cancer early, when it is most treatable. Renown Health is dedicated to guiding you through the process and providing the highest quality of care. Consult with your healthcare provider to determine the appropriate screenings for your specific needs and to take proactive steps toward a healthier future.

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    • Cancer Care
    • Men's Health
    • Screening

    8 Important Health Screenings for Men

    Men are generally less likely to visit their doctor for exams, screenings, and consults compared to women. To address this, we've collaborated with Dr. Bonnie Ferrara of Renown Health, to compile a list of eight essential screenings that can help men maintain their health. 1. Blood Pressure Tests Ages 20+ Blood Pressure tests measure the pressure in your arteries as your heart pumps. Biennial (every two years) checks are recommended if you have normal blood pressure or more frequently if you have high blood pressure (hypertension) or low blood pressure (hypotension). The United States Preventative Services Taskforce cites normal blood pressure below 120 systolic (top number) and 80 diastolic (bottom number). 2. Cholesterol Screening Ages 20+ High levels of cholesterol increase your risk of stroke and heart disease. A simple blood test will help your healthcare provider determine your numbers and if you're at risk. If you have a family history of diabetes or heart disease, you may need yearly screenings. But, again, your doctor can provide the best course of action.

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    • Cancer Care
    • Employees
    • Careers

    Department Spotlight: Radiation Oncology

    Up to half of all men and one-third of all women will face a cancer diagnosis in their lifetime, according to the Nevada Cancer Coalition. Chances are, you or someone you care about has been affected by cancer and has witnessed the ultimate fight for life. More than likely, your loved one’s cancer journey involved radiation therapy – and in fact, more than half of cancer diagnoses are treated in whole or in part with radiation. At first glance, this treatment plan can sound scary to any person. With a cancer care journey, it takes a village, and at Renown Health, we have top-notch leaders of the village roads that lead to radiation.  Meet our Radiation Oncology team at the William N. Pennington Cancer Institute. From intake to inpatient, this department of passionate physicians, radiation therapists, registered nurses, medical assistants, intake coordinators, schedulers and more are here to help every patient dealing with the intimidating diagnosis of cancer. Any patient that needs radiation as a part of their treatment is in the best of hands with this team, who will stop at nothing to ensure each patient under their care knows that they have a village Fighting the Good Fight right alongside them.  Teamwork in Tackling Tumors One of the most common forms of cancer treatment, radiation therapy uses high-energy X-rays to minimize cancerous cells. But with Renown’s Radiation Oncology department, the impressive cancer care doesn’t stop there – this team leverages advanced technology right at their fingertips. In fact, our cancer institute has the most state-of-the-art radiation therapy system of its kind – the ultra-precise Varian TrueBeam radiation therapy system – and is the very first program holding American College of Radiology accreditation in the entire region.  Given the advanced nature of their jobs and the high standard of care their patients expect them to uphold, it’s no question that the days-in-the-life of each team member is complex and can continually change every day.  “There are many moving parts in radiation oncology on any given day,” said Sandra Bailey, Manager of Radiation Oncology Services. “The radiation oncologists consult newly diagnosed patients, follow up with previously treated patients and oversee daily treatments for patients actively receiving treatments. Nurses and medical assistants move around the clinic to support the physicians with patients and provide education and other supportive care.”  The physics and dosimetry teams work diligently alongside the physicians to design the most beneficial treatment plan for each patient. Once a patient begins their treatments, the radiation therapists administer the daily treatments with the utmost precision. Intake coordinators, schedulers and patient access representatives make surethe patients have their insurance authorization and are processed through the system appropriately. Like any well-oiled machine, each part is necessary for the other to function at peak performance to ensure our patients receive the quality care they deserve and expect. Like many other clinical departments at Renown, teamwork coupled with education is crucial to best serve radiation therapy patients. Our nurses on this team are experts at exactly that, serving as a reminder of the transformative power of care in the face of a daunting disease.  “Radiation oncology is a unique world,” said Kristen Reed, Registered Nurse. “We have many different team members that play a role in how we function as a department. We all work together in some aspect to provide care for our patients. As a nurse, I provide patient education to all my patients before starting treatment to go over potential side effects and expectations on their treatment. Daily, we see new patients and follow-ups, plan simulations to start patients for radiation treatments and provide radiation treatments, among many other daily tasks.”  The unique role of our radiation therapists, the team members who are on the frontlines of giving radiation treatments, helps this department stand out from the rest with their tireless dedication to fighting against cancer with compassion and expertise. Not only are they armed with technology, but they are also armed with hands that deliver healing rays of radiation.  “As a radiation therapist, our daily tasks can vary pretty widely,” said Casey Johnson, Radiation Therapist. “We rotate between three radiation treatment machines called linear accelerators – one of which we use for stereotactic radiosurgery, a minimally invasive form of surgical intervention. We also staff the CT simulation room where we construct all the patients' treatment devices and perform their ‘mapping’ scan. We then coordinate with the dosimetrists and physicians to determine the specifics of the patients’ course of treatment. The most important parts of our job are patient care and education. Even though our job is very technical and requires tremendous attention to detail, the critical part is remembering that our average workday could be a monumental day for a new patient.”  “Our day-in-the-life in Radiation Oncology is centered around patient care,” added Haley Longfield, Radiation Therapist. “Although we do not spend a ton of time with our patients, we see them every day. We are able to build a wonderful rapport with our patients that is top-notch. We set up the room with their treatment devices, get them set up appropriately and administer their radiation treatment. On average, our patients are here for about 15 minutes.”  The bottom line: our Radiation Oncology team’s unified commitment to both excellence and innovation promises a brighter future for those battling cancer. No one is ever alone in their fight, and this team makes sure of that, no matter what.  Radiating Excellence in Cancer Care The Pennington Cancer Institute boasts a stellar reputation in our community for offering best-in-class, evidence-based care and cutting-edge research, improving outcomes for patients battling cancer. This fact is what inspired many Radiation Oncology team members to take their talents to this department in the first place.   “I chose to work at the Cancer Institute because I believe we offer the best patient care experience, along with the most advanced radiation treatments in the area,” said Casey Johnson.  "I am a fifth generation Reno resident, and I am part of this community through and through,” added Haley Longfield. “I always knew that I wanted to work here.” The success of our cancer institute starts with our people – and many members of the Radiation Oncology team witnessed this firsthand upon their arrival in this department. “I was initially inspired to move across the country to work in the Cancer Institute by the vision of the senior leaders and the future growth plans for the entire institute; once I arrived, I quickly realized what a great team I am now leading,” said Sandra Bailey. “The compassion and care the Radiation Oncology team provides our patients is second to none. Medical errors are rare in our department, and this can be attributed to not only the processes in place to prevent them, but everyone working together to deliver radiation treatments safely. Each day I witness a patient relationship being nurtured and developed. I am truly honored to be part of this team.”  Inspired by Renown's integral role in the northern Nevada community, several team members were drawn to this department because of the opportunity to make a meaningful impact on patients' lives in a quiet healing environment.  “As a student nurse, I had clinical and practicum on the cancer nursing unit here at Renown; I noticed the quiet, healing environment and a patient population enduring some of life’s most challenging hurdles,” said Rachel Bales, Registered Nurse. “It is in these moments that you can really make a difference as a nurse. After pursuing critical care as a new grad and working in Interventional Radiology with cancer patients, I knew that I had to find my way back to oncology. I applied to Radiation Oncology, and I am working towards my third year in this department. I have always known that I enjoy helping others, and the fulfillment that comes from working with this patient population is unmatched.”  “Renown is a huge part of the community in northern Nevada, and I knew while I was in nursing school that I wanted to have a career here,” added Kristen Reed. “I ended up joining the Cancer Institute about two years ago. My patients are a huge part of why I stay. We really get to know these patients and their families well, especially because they come in from Monday through Friday for up to six weeks for treatments. Building connections and being able to support these patients during a difficult time in their life makes my job fulfilling.”  From the initial consultation to the administration of therapy, the staff's commitment to personalized care remains strong. Patients and their families develop profound connections with these team members as they navigate through the challenges of treatment.  “We have knowledgeable and caring staff that help guide our patients through treatment,” said Kristen Reed. “This starts on the day of their consultation and continues even after completion of treatment. The patients and families get to know the staff through their treatment, and having a familiar face can be reassuring to them. We also take time every week to see how they are doing physically and mentally while undergoing treatment and we give them a chance to check in with their doctor. Taking this time helps reassure patients and allows them to ask questions, and in turn, reduce some anxiety and worry.”

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    • Cancer Care
    • Physical Rehabilitation
    • Physical Therapy

    Life after Lymphedema Diagnosis: What to Expect

    Managing lymphedema effectively is essential for enhancing the quality of life for individuals affected by this condition. Katherine Bunker, a Physical Therapist and Certified Lymphedema Therapist (PT, DPT, CLT) at Renown, has expertise in this area and her insights offer valuable strategies for managing lymphedema.  Lymphedema is a chronic condition characterized by swelling in one or more limbs due to a blockage in the lymphatic system. This condition can result from cancer treatments, surgery, infection, or can sometimes be congenital. While it can be challenging to live with lymphedema, understanding the condition and adopting specific lifestyle changes and strategies can significantly improve the quality of life.   Understanding Lymphedema Educating yourself about lymphedema is crucial. Understanding the causes, symptoms, and potential complications can provide you with the tools to manage the condition proactively. Lymphedema can lead to discomfort, decreased mobility, and in severe cases, infections such as cellulitis. Therefore, recognizing the early signs and knowing when to seek medical advice is essential.   Medical Management  Consulting with healthcare professionals who specialize in lymphedema is critical. A physiotherapist or occupational therapist trained in lymphedema management can tailor a treatment plan for you that can include the following: Compression Therapy - Wearing prescribed compression garments can help move the lymph fluid and reduce swelling. It’s essential to get fitted by a professional and understand how to use these garments correctly.   Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) a gentle massage technique that encourages the movement of lymph fluid out of the affected limb. It’s typically performed by a trained therapist but ask about self-massage techniques you can do at home.

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    • Cancer Care
    • Renown Health Foundation
    • Women's Health
    • Patient Story

    Celebrating Resilience: Raquel's Remarkable Journey Through Breast Cancer Treatment

    Raquel was 33 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was April 2023, when she found a lump in her breast and was referred to the William N. Pennington Cancer Institute. After comprehensive imaging, she was diagnosed with invasive lobular carcinoma, which is a type of breast cancer that begins in the milk-producing glands of the breast. Between June 2023 and January 2024, she received a total mastectomy, chemotherapy and radiation at Renown Health. “Breast cancer is uncommon in women under 40, but any woman with a mass or lump in her breast should have an exam by a physician and imaging at any age,” said Dr. Lee Schwartzberg. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only 9% of all new cases of breast cancer in the U.S. are found in women younger than 45. “It was a pretty scary diagnosis, but I’ve been led by great people through the process,” she said. “They were so helpful and there for me throughout the chemo and radiation.” Raquel's journey through breast cancer treatment at the William N. Pennington Cancer Institute was marked by the exceptional care provided by the Renown Health team, including nurses, nurse navigators, therapists, support teams and providers. Among the dedicated professionals, Dr. Michelle Chu and Dr. Lee Schwartzberg played pivotal roles in Raquel's diagnosis and subsequent treatment plan. Their expertise, compassion and commitment to patient care left an indelible impact on Raquel's experience. Their thorough examination and comprehensive approach ensured that Racquel received the best possible care for her invasive lobular carcinoma. In addition to the care provided at Renown, Raquel greatly benefitted from being connected with a mentor by Dr. Chu. This mentor, Kayla, had undergone a similar diagnosis and treatment plan, and at the same age Raquel. They texted and called each other throughout Raquel’s treatment, providing additional support through a challenging time. As of January 2024, Raquel is done with her treatment and continues to see her care team for follow-up appointments. “I’m through the worst and ready to rebuild my life,” Raquel said. To help celebrate this milestone, Nevada Athletics invited Raquel to receive the game ball at a Nevada Men’s Basketball game. She was joined on the basketball court for this special recognition by her husband, Raul; mother, Arlene; and two daughters, Ryleigh and Rhiannon. Racquel's journey is not only a testament to her resilience but also a tribute to the invaluable contributions of Dr. Chu and Dr. Schwartzberg in guiding her towards triumph over breast cancer.

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    • Cancer Care
    • Screening
    • Women's Health

    How Regular Cervical Cancer Screenings Can Save Lives

    According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 13,820 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed, and 4,360 women will die from cervical cancer. However, cervical cancer is preventable with regular screening tests and the HPV vaccine. It’s important to note that medical advances have allowed progress in diagnosing and treating cervical cancer. While it used to be one of the most common causes of cancer death for American women, the incidence of death has significantly declined. What to Know About the HPV Vaccine HPV vaccination is the best way to prevent cervical cancer and is recommended for all youth starting as early as age 9, or for teens and adults up to age 45 who didn’t start or finish the series. In Nevada, only 50.1% of teens ages 13-17 have been vaccinated for HPV.  There are 13 types of HPV, and the vaccine Gardasil 9 protects against 9 of those HPV strains, greatly reducing the incidence of cervical cancer among vaccinated individuals. What to Know About Cervical Cancer Screenings The CDC says the most important thing you can do to help prevent cervical cancer is to have regular screening tests starting at age 21. And there are two common tests that can detect early stages of cervical cancer (or precancer) and improve health outcomes. The pap test (or pap smear). This screening looks for precancers. Women should begin getting pap smears when they’re 21. The human papillomavirus (HPV) test looks for the virus that can cause these cell changes. Cervical Cancer Screening Schedule The American Cancer Society offers the following guidelines for screenings: All women should begin cervical cancer screening at 21. Women between 21 and 29 should have a pap test every three years. Beginning at 30, the preferred way to screen is with a pap test combined with an HPV test every five years. This is called co-testing and should continue until age 65. A pap test (or pap smear) is performed during a regular screening appointment to look for precancers, cell changes on the cervix that might become cervical cancer if they are not evaluated or appropriately treated. Typically outpatient procedures can reduce the risk of long-term health impacts that prevent pre-cancerous cells from becoming cancer cells. Women over 65 who have had regular screenings in the previous ten years should stop cervical cancer screening as long as they haven’t had any severe precancers found in the last 20 years. How to Get Screened Request an appointment with your primary care physician or OBGYN to schedule a screening.

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    • HealthyNV Project
    • Research and Studies
    • Mammogram
    • Genetic
    • Cancer Care

    Optimizing Mammogram Screenings: A Genetic Approach to a Personalized Screening Schedule

    © Arthon Meekodong via Canva.com Breast cancer screening has long been a cornerstone of women's healthcare. With 1 in 8 women diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime1, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has developed screening recommendations to help detect early-stage cancer. Notably in 2023, the USPSTF revised the recommended age for biennial mammogram screenings for women with average risk to start at age 40 instead of 502, estimated to result in 19% more lives being saved3 by starting screening earlier. While initiating screening at an earlier age offers advantages to a wide demographic, concerns about the potential of over-screening prompted research into the feasibility of identifying women with lower breast cancer risk who could safely delay mammograms. While guidelines address high-risk individuals, a notable gap exists in providing recommendations tailored to those at lower risk. To gain insight into a patient's risk level, physicians are able to utilize genetic testing to understand an individual's genetic makeup, providing precise insights into their predisposition to various health conditions, including breast cancer. Armed with this genetic information, healthcare providers could craft tailored screening strategies that align with an individual’s specific risk profile. This genetic risk-based approach underscores the value of genetics in individualizing the onset of screening to help avoid over-screening and its associated costs. Surprisingly, genetic information is not currently being widely utilized to identify women at risk of breast cancer or other diseases in clinical practice, despite its potential to make a significant positive impact for patients. A recent retrospective analysis of 25,591 women from the Healthy Nevada Project4 sheds light on the potential benefits of this genetic risk-based approach. The study classified 2,338 (9.1%) of these women as having a low genetic risk for breast cancer. What's remarkable is that these women exhibited a significantly lower and later onset of breast cancer compared to their average or high-risk counterparts. This finding suggests that it might be safe for low-risk women to delay mammogram screening by 5 to 10 years without compromising their health.

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    • Kid's Health
    • Pediatric Oncology
    • Employees
    • Cancer Care
    • Pediatric Care

    Department Spotlight: Children’s Infusion Services

    Help us celebrate the holiday season by sharing joy with our Children’s Infusion Services team!  Thinking about blood can make any of us squeamish, and seeing it can be even more intimidating to the children in our lives. Being treated for a condition that requires blood transfusions or chemotherapy infusions is no easy feat, especially during the holiday season. This time of year, we are proud that we can offer our pediatric patients the power of proximity and excellence by having access to high level care close to home.  The Children’s Infusion Services (CIS) department at Renown Children’s Hospital is committed to bringing the gift of quality care to our community’s youngest patients. Whether they are caring for a child with a blood disorder or giving expert infusion care for a child battling cancer, no team does what they do better than these expert nurses, medical assistants, intake coordinators and physicians.  ‘Tis the Season to Bring Hope As the only pediatric oncology and hematology program in the region, the CIS department has a lot of responsibility on their shoulders. From inpatient chemotherapy to outpatient infusion services, this team treats a long list of pediatric blood conditions including:  Pediatric cancers Anemias Immune-mediated blood disorders Sickle-cell disease Bone marrow failure syndromes Bleeding disorders  “Our team provides a large variety of services from labs draws, sedations for procedures, infusions for diagnoses such as Crohn's disease, blood transfusions, as well as chemotherapy,” said Jen Torres, RN.  “Our team works extremely well together. We try to go above and beyond for our patients every day. It may be something as simple as a hug to comfort a parent or a special birthday gift for a patient.”  “My job allows me to work with several departments and providers when coordinating care for our littlest of patients,” added Jane Strawn, Intake Coordinator. “I assure proper authorizations are in place for the care that is needed, I communicate with our families when scheduling appointments, I organize End of Treatment Celebrations, as well as birthday shout outs and work closely with our Child Life team to help make the challenging appointment little easier.”  To best serve their patients, the team thrives on being expert multitaskers. Central line care, chemotherapy administration, blood transfusions, medication management, preventative injections, lab draws, lumbar punctures, biopsies, imaging – you name it, they do it. And they do it all with the utmost focus on safety and support.  “Our days have a lot of variation, as we perform a number of different services,” said Meagan Bertotti, RN. “We provide infusions for patients with chronic or acute medical conditions and chemotherapy/biotherapy treatment to patients undergoing cancer treatments. Overall, though, we work as a team to make these difficult procedures and treatments as easy as possible for the patients and families by providing engagement and support.”  “While we handle a lot of chemotherapy treatments for pediatric patients, we also do other infusions and transfusions as well such as blood and platelet transfusions, enzyme replacement therapies, different types of injections such as Rabies vaccine or Synagis for high-risk babies who need that extra protection during the RSV season, and lab draws,” said Chelsea Angues, RN. “We care for patients that get their therapies from outside hospitals, but the patient lives within the Reno area. We receive orders from those outside hospitals to care for those patients, so they can still be with their families and not have to travel.”  As members of the Children’s Oncology Group, a highly-regarded clinical trials group where over 90% of pediatric cancer patients across the U.S. receive treatment, teams like CIS in Renown Children’s Hospital deliver the highest standard of care. This partnership is a true testament to the devoted collaboration and relationship-building this team commits to on behalf of their patients every day.  "One of the biggest accomplishments of our team is the fact that we became a member of the Children’s Oncology Group, and the Children's Infusion Center and Pediatric Oncology became one unit,” said Shelby Nolte. "Instead of being a clinic on one side and an infusion center on the other, we really came together to make it a whole unit that collaborates on almost everything.”  “We've put much time into trying to understand other departments, their flow, their rationales and their processes so we can come to a solution that benefits our patients the greatest,” added Tiffany Macie, RN. “We've taken the last few years to really build our relationships with our pharmacy staff, our lab staff and our central supply resources. Our relationship building extends beyond the walls of the Renown building as well and out to the community providers too. In the past few years, we've been able to build relationships with the providers in the community where they trust they can send us their patients for treatment and lab draws. Finally, we've spent much time working on the relationships as a team. It's emotional work we do on our unit, and these families become our family. It's important to us that we take the time to be together outside of our shifts to enjoy one another and laugh!”  In the compassionate realm of pediatric healthcare, CIS knows that the complexities of a cancer or blood disorder diagnosis can take an emotional toll on their patients and families. The team firmly believes that emotional support can be as important as the physical and medical support throughout each patient’s unique care journey, striving to be a comforting presence during daunting times.  “The most important part of my day is collaborating with the Children's Infusion team to make life manageable for the families that are going through this experience,” added Shelby Nolte, Senior Medical Assistant. “We work as a team to make life easier for the blow of a cancer diagnosis.  We are there for our families in every way.  If they need a shoulder to cry on, an ear to listen or just someone to play cards with or tell a funny story too, we are there.”  “One of the things our team does extremely well to help our patients and their families with new diagnoses is to simply meet them where they are,” said Tiffany Macie. “That looks different for every family and every patient. We work in an environment where can build relationships with our patients and their families. This allows us the unique opportunity to really get to know them. We learn their fears, their joys, their worries, what their family lives are like, and we learn how to best meet them where they are.”  Transcending the conventional boundaries of care, the CIS department closely supports each patient, offering them solace tailored to the unique fabric of each family's life.

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    • Employee Story
    • Nursing
    • Cancer Care
    • Management
    • Employees

    20 Years of Compassion and Dedication

    When you meet Poeth Kilonzo, Director of Oncology Nursing at Renown Health, you are immediately greeted with a warm smile that puts your mind at ease. Within the William N. Pennington Cancer Institute, Poeth enjoys a strong reputation among her employees and patients as someone they can always rely on, no matter how rough the tides may flow.   As an incredibly humble oncology professional, you may not realize that behind that smile is the power of a best-in-class nurse and leader holding a 20+ year career of diverse nursing experience and leadership excellence – dedicating the majority of her service to Renown Health.  Join us as we dive into Poeth’s unique journey through Renown.  Finding Her Passion  Ever since she could remember, Poeth has been a “people person.” Above all else, she cared for people – and she cared a lot. What better place for her to be than healthcare?  After moving to northern Nevada from Kenya, she began working in private patient care working with home health and dementia patients while taking classes at Truckee Meadows Community College (TMCC) in 2000. One day, a patient asked her a question that would change the course of her career journey: Did you ever think about becoming a nurse?  Driven by not only the words of encouragement of her patients and supervisors in home health but also the rallying support from her family and friends, including her husband and high school friend, who both have decades of experience interacting with nurses in healthcare (with her husband spending many of those years at Renown), Poeth knew this was the path she was meant to take.  “That was it; it was like a light switch had flipped,” said Poeth. “I switched to nursing overnight.”  According to Poeth, TMCC’s nursing program offered her an incredibly supportive environment, which was especially important as she was a young mom at the time. Working in healthcare, going to nursing school and raising a family all at the same time is no easy task, but to Poeth, this was her calling.  “Regardless of my path, I knew I wanted to be a nurse that was close to patients, sitting with them and holding their hand throughout their treatment,” said Poeth.  During nursing school, Poeth completed clinicals at several hospitals in Reno – three of them were at Renown Health (known as Washoe Medical Center at the time). What immediately stood out to her was the passion of the pediatrics unit, especially in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).  “While I knew that pediatrics wasn’t going to be my arena, some of the best times in my life were during my pediatrics clinical,” said Poeth. “It opened me up to how welcoming Renown is.”  While doing her rotations, nursing leaders helped Poeth and her fellow classmates discover Renown’s Nurse Apprentice program, an apprenticeship designed exclusively for local northern Nevada nursing students. One of those leaders asked her, “have you considered doing a rotation in oncology?”  And another light switch flipped.  “Bingo. I am becoming an oncology nurse apprentice,” Poeth recalls. And that’s exactly what she did.   After her four-month apprenticeship ended in February 2002, she walked into her interview with Joanna Gold, who would end up being her supervisor and one of her greatest mentors until she passed away in recent years. With her experience and enthusiastic spirit on her side, Poeth fervently expressed her passion and interest in working in oncology. And Joanna saw all of that and more.  In June 2002, Poeth was presented with a two-year oncology RN contract, which she easily signed – however, she knew right then and there but she was not going anywhere. Renown was her home, and oncology ignited the fire within her.  “The nurses in this unit are part of what kept me here,” Poeth remembers. “These nurses would really do anything for their patients. The commitment and love they all had for one another truly was like family. It inspired me to learn more and give even better care to my patients."  To Poeth, it didn’t feel like she was coming to work just to do a job – she was following her dreams.  “You don’t think about the work you do; you think about the service,” said Poeth.  From there, Poeth spent three years on the floor as an oncology RN and became a night shift supervisor in 2005. She was thriving.  But this part of her journey was only the beginning.  When Opportunity Arises, Take It  In March 2007, Poeth and her husband welcomed their third child – and for her, working a day shift position would serve her the best at her current stage of life. This revelation led her down to Renown South Meadows Medical Center, where she became a staff nurse in Medical Telemetry.  It was in the telemetry unit where Poeth contributed to one of the largest digital transformations Renown would ever go through: transitioning from paper records to electronic records on EPIC.  From there, Poeth was inspired to get back into leadership in 2012 as the Supervisor of Clinical Nursing overseeing nurses, clinical outcomes and payroll in the medical/telemetry unit and intensive care unit (ICU). The timing of her leadership role lined up perfectly with her decision to take her skills to the next level, achieving a bachelor’s degree from Nevada State College in 2016. The timing of her degree lined up perfectly with what was about to come; she embarked on her first leadership role at Renown  This is where she would happily stay for 11 years, eventually becoming the Manager of Nursing in telemetry and the ICU, noting that Renown South Meadows felt like a second home to her.  “I wore many hats at South Meadows,” Poeth recalls. “From piloting back coding and handling compliance work to being on the patient floor and heading up South Meadows’ first high school hospital volunteer program, I got very involved. We had seven years without having a single nurse traveler in our unit."  It wasn’t long before Poeth was inspired to expand her education even further, and she graduated in January 2018 with a master’s degree in nursing clinical leadership from Western Governors University. Thanks to Renown’s educational assistance programs, our health system invested directly in Poeth’s education with tuition reimbursement and a $1,000 nursing scholarship.  Soon after celebrating her achievement, Jennifer Allen Fleiner – who was the Director of Nursing at Renown South Meadows at the time – asked Poeth yet another question that would bring her to the precipice of another career detour: “Have you ever considered transferring from South Meadows to Renown Regional?”   Moments later, Alicia Glassco, Director of Nursing for Renown Regional, asked her the same question, noting that the hospital’s neurosurgery unit needed the leadership of someone just like Poeth.  “It took me a whole week to make a decision, because this was one of the toughest decisions I’ve ever made in my life,” said Poeth. “I truly loved South Meadows. After that week, my leader told me, ‘you know what, Poeth? You’ve reached your pinnacle. You need and deserve a new challenge. Learn from this new team and teach them something. I think you have a huge opportunity for growth.”  So, Poeth decided to apply for the position and shadow the neurosurgery team, where unlike her unit, the majority of the team at the time were travelers. But this was a challenge Poeth was up to – so she was accepted into the role.  “At the end of the day, these patients deserved consistent care,” Poeth emphasized. “I knew I had to take this position for the patients – they were the ones who sold me on this job. They are the reason why we are all here. It was important for me to be an advocate for them.”  The big hills to climb didn’t slow down Poeth; in fact, the exact opposite happened. Within her first year in the neurosurgery unit, her team onboarded 18 new graduates and replaced travelers.  “We were hiring like crazy,” said Poeth. “My standing agenda at all section meetings focused on hiring and our quality metrics. I started having a relationship with our doctors. Once we created a strong doctor/nurse collaboration, our nurses started staying with us longer.”  Everything on the unit was going great.  Then, COVID-19 hit.   “Since we had private patient rooms, our unit became the first COVID unit at Renown Regional,” Poeth recalls. “My whole staff that I had built up had to be distributed elsewhere. I started caring for COVID patients. We relied on our Infection Prevention team a lot. And at the same time, I was worried about my family in Africa.”  Despite the stressful nature that the pandemic brought upon health systems everywhere, according to Poeth, she knew she had to continue on.  “The neurosurgery team ended up merging with orthopedic trauma, which was very difficult,” said Poeth. “We went from 28 beds to 58 beds. The key to success here was training. Nurses are very resilient, and through training, we were able to stabilize the unit.”  Noticing the opportunity for virtual demonstrations that were previously offered only in-person, Poeth spearheaded online trainings for nursing, physical therapy, mobility, head injuries and more, allowing teams across Renown to upskill in safe spaces.  These programs continued throughout the pandemic, and Poeth was proud to be a figurehead through it all, helping to stabilize the unit while creating strong relationships with the entire team, many of whom followed her from Renown South Meadows to Renown Regional.  Then, she gets another visitor – her Chief Nursing Executive – in her office with yet another opportunity.  Have You Considered...  In September 2022, Chief Nursing Executive Melodie Osborn walked into Poeth’s office with those three words that Poeth has heard for decades: “Have you considered...”  “Before Melodie could even finish, I thought, ‘I have considered A LOT in my career!’” said Poeth.  Melodie told Poeth that the William N. Pennington Cancer Institute was looking for a Director of Oncology Nursing, noting that this could be yet another growth opportunity for her and a chance for her to go back to her roots.  “I had just celebrated my twentieth year at Renown; I knew this was going to be a decision I really had to think about,” said Poeth. “Everyone believed in me. Alicia Glassco told me, ‘Poeth, you are ready for this. Go for it.’ Once I applied for the position and started getting my updated chemotherapy certifications, I thought, ‘they are right; I got this.’”  At this point in her career, Poeth had been hyper-focused on inpatient care, and this role would be her first time caring for patients in the outpatient setting. After going through the interview process, however, Poeth knew that this was where she was meant to be yet again – and colleagues she hadn’t seen in years reaffirmed that commitment.  “I felt the most excited about the job when I toured the facility,” Poeth recalls. “I’ll never forget what one of the infusion nurses told me on my tour. She told me, ‘I don’t know if you remember me, but I remember you; I came from Renown South Meadows, and you were so nice to me as I was precepting as a new nurse. Your kindness was unforgettable to me.’ The fact that people like her wanted me in the unit so badly inspired me to come back.”  Soon enough, Poeth became the Director of Oncology Nursing, a position she still proudly holds to this day. Once she was hired, she immediately went into deep learning mode, mastering skills such as revenue integrity, credentialing and the insurance process. She attributes Supervisor of Infusion Kaitlin Hildebrand and Director of Radiation Oncology Services Susan Cox for helping her succeed.  Shortly after assuming the position, Poeth noticed yet another opportunity for cross-training within the organization to combat short staffing – training nurses from the Float Pool to care for patients in Infusion Services.  “Between May and July of this year, we trained six nurses from Float Pool to do infusion therapy services, which offered so much relief to my team; I am so thankful to Rendee Perry, the Manager of Nursing in our Float Pool unit, and her team for their support,” said Poeth. “My mission in outpatient oncology is to serve the staff and patient population and create those strong relationships."  Poeth's efforts to circumvent nurse burnout go beyond cross-training – as a director, she is always there for her team members no matter what, leading with kindness every step of the way.  “I never miss a 7:45 a.m. huddle unless I am in a ‘cannot miss’ commitment; I want my employees to always know that I am there for them and that they are cared for both on and off the job,” Poeth emphasizes. “I want them to feel like they are valued, their families are valued and their mental health is valued; after all, without my team, we cannot care for patients. It’s important for them to know that I am here to be a security blanket and that there is always something we can do to solve a problem."  Today, Poeth enjoys a full team of core Renown staff members whom patients look forward to seeing – and the high patient satisfaction scores to prove it.  “Our team is so established that patients feel comfort in knowing they are always going to know exactly who they are being treated by,” said Poeth. “We will always work to maintain that consistency.”  Staying True to the Mission  Renown’s mission of making a genuine difference in the health and well-being of our community resonates closely with Poeth. Before she arrives at the infusion unit every day, she asks herself: What can I do to make it easier for my team to deliver care?  “It takes a village to deliver the care we do,” said Poeth. “Our nurses are priceless. You can’t place a monetary value on dealing with life and death every day. This is what inspires me. It’s all about helping each other out and keeping those relationships strong.”  Maintaining those relationships on the floor, according to Poeth, requires one main ingredient: work-life balance.  “I want my nurses to be able to balance sending their kids to kindergarten and giving their patients their first chemotherapy treatments,” Poeth emphasizes. “I genuinely care about their lives. It’s nice when you get to know your team’s children, grandkids, spouse and hobbies. I’m grateful that Renown has given us the autonomy to foster that flexible environment within our teams. It is so rewarding to have such a strong impact on these employees.”  To Poeth, it’s all about doing and then duplicating. Luckily for her team and infusion patients in northern Nevada, a new infusion center at Renown South Meadows is planned to open in the coming years as part of our commitment to expanding care. Her team is excited to grow their expertise down to south Reno – Poeth's original home hospital.  “I strongly believe that as nurses, we are meant to be where we are meant to be at the time,” said Poeth. “Be kind to yourself and remember your ‘why.’ Take advantage of the opportunity you have.”  To all nurses (and future nurses) out there, Poeth wants you to know that you are welcomed and valued. You are saving lives every day, and to her, that is worth everything.  “Always remain focused, even throughout all the challenges. Never forget why you got into nursing. And lastly, always stay true to your own mission,” closes Poeth.

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    • Cancer Care
    • Renown Health

    Navigating Renowns Cancer Care Resources Your Essential Guide

    Cancer is challenging, but no one has to go through it alone. Patients and their loved ones can navigate the journey towards healing and recovery with the proper support and resources from Renown Health.  When faced with a cancer diagnosis, access to reliable and comprehensive cancer resources is key. These resources provide vital information, support, and guidance for patients, caregivers and loved ones throughout cancer treatment and recovery. Cancer Resources Breast Cancer Newly Diagnosed Orientation Class  Cancer Support Groups  Caregiver Support  General Cancer Support Group  Lymphedema & Physical Therapy  Men’s Prostate Cancer Support Group  Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Workshop  Smoking Cessation  Spiritual Center Activities & Programs  Sterling Silver 55+ Club Facebook Group  At Renown and in collaboration with community partnerships, we offer a variety of resources and specialty care programs focused on improving the quality of life after cancer including:  Cancer support groups play a crucial role in providing emotional, psychological, and practical assistance to those affected by cancer   These groups often consist of individuals who have been through similar experiences and can offer guidance, empathy, and understanding.   They provide a safe space for individuals to share their feelings, concerns, and experiences with others who truly understand what they are going through.

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    • Cancer Care
    • Employees
    • Nursing

    Department Spotlight: Infusion Services

    October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Join us in honoring our Chemotherapy & Infusion Services team at Renown Health!  Living life with a chronic condition is never easy – and the road to recovery can take many different turns. When it comes to a daunting diagnosis like cancer or a lifelong illness like multiple sclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis, chemotherapy, transfusions and IV medications are often significant parts of the puzzle. We’re proud to introduce our experts that provide that crucial puzzle piece.  The Chemotherapy & Infusion Services department at Renown Health is where compassionate care meets cutting-edge expertise. Proudly boasting a 100% patient satisfaction rate for 2023, this team – which encompasses nurses, physicians, pharmacists, dietitians, social workers, scheduling and insurance staff and financial counselors – embodies a profound dedication to healing while simultaneously empowering patients to face their diagnosis with resilience and hope.  Going Above and Beyond  The expertise within the Infusion Services team is unmatched in the region, offering education and treatment for a wide variety of illnesses, including:  Cancer Multiple sclerosis (MS) Anemia Osteoporosis Osteomyelitis Rheumatoid arthritis Genetic disorders Polycythemia vera  According to this team, it truly takes a village to deliver this expert care to all their patients.  “It's really impressive how many key players are involved in caring for our patients!” said Kaitlin Hildebrand, Supervisor of Infusion Services. “The process starts with our amazing Medical Oncology team or community providers referring patients to us. Our nurses are the absolute best advocates for our patients and are amazing at what they do; over half of us are Certified Oncology Nurses. We couldn’t do what we do without our CNAs or our pharmacy team as well; they are such valuable resources for us.”  “It is remarkable to think of the details that take place to ensure care for our patients,” added Amanda Thomas, Chemotherapy RN Specialist. “First, our incredible intake team schedules and obtains authorization, and the patient access representatives check in our patients. From there, our CNAs greet our patients, take their vital signs, ensure they have the proper nutrition and make sure they feel welcomed and comfortable with the process. Then, our chemotherapy specialist RN – which is my role – reviews treatments and coordinates with providers, personalizing care for each patient. In the background, the pharmacy specialists perform safety checks and medication preparation. And of course, our sincerely caring team of nurses assess, care and treat the patient while ensuring they feel educated, led by the charge nurse who supports the team doing safety verifications for all chemotherapies.”  Managing a diagnosis is more than medication – the hope and healing this team provides their patients is a huge aspect of each patient’s journey.  “We work together to take care of this amazing population of patients,” said Stacy Demitropoulos, Infusion Services RN. “We go above and beyond. It is more than just giving patients their medications. It is about human connection, helping them navigate this journey in their health and so much more! We help to troubleshoot problems they may be having and help give them resources.”  “I view going through someone’s cancer journey with them as a privilege,” added Ashley Gravelle, Infusion Services RN. “I try to just meet them where they are. Sometimes we are the only people patients are truly able to express themselves to, whether that be complaining about symptoms, talking about death and dying or being lighthearted about something really serious. I will be whatever the patient needs me to be that day.”  While the work of infusion therapy is fast-paced and requires close attention to time and detail, these teammates are never alone. They work closely together to ensure every patient gets the individualized care they need and deserve.  “Infusion Therapy is busy and extremely time-oriented,” said Audrey Arthur, Infusion Services RN.   “Between handling chemotherapy, immunotherapy, blood products, injections, antibiotics and central lines, there is always a task that needs to be handled. There is an expectation to provide detailed care as swiftly as possible so that these patients can go back home to their families. Additionally, you must keep treatment moving forward so the next person waiting in the lobby can receive their treatment in an appropriate and timely manner.”  “Life in the infusion center is fast-paced but rewarding,” added Nick Leid, Infusion Pharmacist. “The protocols that have been put in place by our clinical specialists allow us to provide patient care for dozens of patients every day while remaining safe and accurate. On the pharmacy side of the infusion center, we ensure that protocols are being adhered to: Making sure doses are calculated correctly, labs are appropriate for treatment, pre-medications for nausea and other symptoms are ordered correctly and that the products delivered to the patient are made correctly.”  “A day in the life of an infusion nurse is a busy one,” added Ashley Gravelle. “We care for usually 9-10 patients each on a given day, and the treatment ranges from chemotherapy and antibiotics to various biologics, TP, injections, lab draws and port/central line care. You have to be an excellent multitasker and be able to switch gears very quickly. It is impossible to do this work without our whole team. When one of us needs help, someone is always there to jump in. We work as a well- oiled machine.”  Together, the infusion services team exemplifies the power of compassionate care, dedication and expertise, lighting the way for healthier tomorrows.

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    • Cancer Care
    • Employees
    • Providers

    Department Spotlight: Medical Oncology

    The month of September recognizes several cancer-related health observances. Join us in celebrating our Medical Oncology team at Renown!  No person ever wants to hear the words, “You have cancer.” Those three short yet impactful words immediately change the course of someone’s life. As these patients Fight the Good Fight against cancer, there are a lot of intimidating unknowns that can take over their minds. What happens next? What will my treatment be like? What is my prognosis? How will I be able to handle this physically and emotionally? What will it take for me to beat this?  Who is better to be by their side than the devoted team members at the William N. Pennington Cancer Institute at Renown Health? From helping patients manage the process of complex paperwork and referrals to delivering personalized oncology and hematology treatment options tailored to each individual diagnosis, those fighting virtually any type of cancer are never alone, thanks to this team. The William N. Pennington Cancer Institute always lives up to that promise, guiding patients through the daunting journey of cancer treatment ahead, one step at a time.  Courageous Against Cancer Our exceptional Medical Oncology department inherently understands that each moment in life is precious, especially for patients battling cancer. This team is dedicated to orchestrating the most comprehensive plan for each patient, seamlessly weaving together diagnoses and treatments, oral chemotherapy, medication management, clinical trials, radiation oncology and more.   With the many patients they impact, there’s no question that there is never a dull moment in the day of the life of a healing hero like those in this department.  “No day is the same in Medical Oncology,” said Hollyann Dehm, Registered Nurse. “As a nurse, we wear many hats in the clinic. Our role is to educate patients on their treatment plans and specific drugs they are receiving, triage symptom calls from patients, refill medications and implement our oral chemotherapy program.  We help provide direct patient care by accessing ports, drawing labs and giving IV hydration when needed.  We also help fill out family and medical leave (FMLA)/disability paperwork, help with physician orders, help obtain prior authorizations for prescribed medications and treatments.”  “We do our best to let our patients know that they will not be going through this alone,” added Danielle Say, Physician Scheduling Coordinator. "We will be here for them every step of the way, guiding them and making sure their treatment is as smooth as possible and making ourselves available to them as much as we can. We end up getting to know many of our patients on a very close, personal level, and this helps to build that trust.”  “Our day-to-day activities include seeing patients and helping to manage their therapies as well as their toxicities,” added Dr. Harry Menon, DO, Oncology Physician. “We work closely with our infusion room staff and have a robust team to help us deal with these complex patients. We also work very closely with our surgical and radiation oncology colleagues in a multidisciplinary fashion to provide comprehensive care for our patients.”  The Medical Oncology team excels not only in providing cutting-edge cancer care but also in their compassionate approach to helping patients reduce the anxieties they understandably feel. Recognizing that a cancer diagnosis can be an emotionally overwhelming experience, this dedicated team combines medical expertise with unwavering support to create a healing environment.  “When patients are referred to our department, a lot of them have many fears and questions,” said Heather Cortez, Medical Assistant. “A majority of what our team does is focused on the mental support that our patients require to help them have the most successful outcomes. One thing I have learned about cancer care is that positivity in the face of adversity is everything. Just being there to listen to our patient’s concerns can make all the difference. Helping them to navigate their many appointments and taking the time to explain things in a patient and compassionate way, is part of how our team serves this vulnerable population.”  “The uncertainty is one of my patients' biggest fears: How far has my cancer progressed? How long will I have left? Is treatment even an option?” added Mary Wilson, Senior Medical Assistant. “The best advice that I can give my patients is that they are not alone. While this battle is going to be one of the hardest parts of their lives, they are surrounded by constant support to try and help with any burdens they may be facing. I also tell my patients that we have to take the little wins no matter how small they may be, because while cancer treatment is a physical battle, it is also a large mental battle."  “While we don’t have answers to all the questions patients and their family members may have, we do our best to listen to their questions and concerns regarding their cancer diagnosis and treatment and guide them through their cancer journey," added Hollyann Dehm. “We provide emotional support and education on their type of cancer, managing their pain and side effects of their treatment.  We also connect them to nurse navigators and our social worker who also help identify barriers to care and provide the patient with resources.”  Whether it's explaining treatment options in understandable terms or offering emotional support through difficult moments, this department is committed to empowering patients on their journey toward healing. Their holistic approach not only treats the disease but also nurtures the spirit, all while being a strong advocate on each patient’s behalf.  “Getting a cancer diagnosis can be the worst news that a person can hear; what we try to do is focus on improving quality life and focus on goals that help to promote quality of life,” said Dr. Harry Menon. “If the option for a cure is on the table, we try and focus on that goal in concert with promoting quality life. I try and have our patients focus on what they can control, with the understanding that even if some things are out of our control, the way we approach and manage those things, including our mindset, is still within our control.”  “In our clinic, we truly value our patients and how they are cared for,” added Mary Wilson. “The amount of compassion our team shows is incredible. Patients constantly commend our team on how much they feel like the provider's care. Our providers and staff are not afraid to advocate for patients and that truly is an accomplishment in and of itself.”  “We know patients are only hearing a small amount of the immense volume of information we provide them, so we encourage them to ask questions until it makes sense because the timeframe is different for every patient,” said Lillian Morton, APRN of Medical Oncology. “Cancer is an anxiety inducing lack of control whirlwind – if we can help by being responsive to patient calls and messages, we do so.”  With their harmonious and integrated approach, each patient’s treatment journey progresses uninterrupted, bringing them closer to a brighter and healthier future.

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