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    • Pediatric Care
    • Primary Care
    • Mental Health
    • Expert Advice

    3 Ways to Foster the Wellbeing of LGBTQIA+ Kids and Teens

    Ensuring a healthier and more inclusive future for LGBTQIA+ children and teens is of utmost importance to health systems in our community, especially Renown. Supporting the physical and mental health of youth in this community is key to those efforts, especially as they face unique challenges in terms of identity acceptance and social integration.   Dr. Caroline Barangan, Adolescent Medicine Physician with Renown Children’s Pediatric Specialty Care, discusses what you as a parent, caregiver, friend or support system can do to be a safe space for children and teens who identify as LGBTQIA+. 1.  Create a Safe Space at Home The most important action you can take for your LGBTQIA+ teen or child is to accept and support them for who they are, regardless of how they identify. “Being a teenager is already difficult enough, especially within the LGBTQIA+ community, which puts them at risk of being stigmatized, rejected and targets for bullying,” said Dr. Barangan.  Your supportive words and actions can make a huge difference as a profound expression of love and understanding. Being patient and willing to learn are the foundations to a healthy and loving relationship with your LGBTQIA+ teen or child.  2.  Encourage Regular Check-Ups with a Primary Care Provider (PCP)  Establishing your child or teen with a PCP is not only important when an illness occurs but also for annual preventative visits and regular check-ups. “A primary care provider can screen for high-risk behaviors that would put a patient’s health in jeopardy, such as sexual experience, substance use, suicidality and self-harm,” said. Dr Barangan. “These screenings are an opportunity to provide the education and support these kids and teens need to stay healthy.”  One of the main concerns LGBTQIA+ youth often have is that they will experience judgment from their provider, or the PCP will disclose sensitive information, including their sexuality or gender identity to their parents, when they are not ready to do so. Dr. Barangan emphatically reminds us that this legally cannot happen. “If a patient asks me to keep something confidential, unless they disclose that they have plans to harm themselves or others, I am legally not allowed to share that information with anyone without their permission,” said Dr. Barangan.  3.  Locate Local Resources  Northern Nevada is home to a variety of resources for the LGBTQIA+ community at large, including youth members of this community. "Finding resources to help them develop in a positive way and provide them with the information they need, whether it be in school, the household, the community or through a medical or mental health provider, is incredibly important,” said Dr. Barangan.  Below is a list of local LGBTQIA+ community resources open to you and your children:  Our Center LGBTQIA+ Health Services at Northern Nevada HOPES Northern Nevada Pride Festival & Community Parade (happens every July in Reno) Sassabration (happens every September in Carson City) Lake Tahoe Pride (events and resources shared on Facebook)

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    • Prevention and Wellness
    • Primary Care
    • Vaccine
    • Screening
    • Expert Advice
    • University Health

    6 Healthcare Action Items for the LGBTQIA+ Community

    Every patient, regardless of how they may identify, greatly benefits from preventive healthcare and early detection. Members of the LGBTQIA+ community face unique considerations when it comes to their health, and a proactive approach to preventive screenings and vaccines is important in order to address their individual health needs.  Dr. Karen Thiele, Family Medicine Physician with University Health and Assistant Professor of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine, breaks down key steps that LGBTQIA+ patients should take to safeguard their health.  PrEP and PEP  Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a strategy to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It is an important measure for those who are HIV-negative but may be at risk of contracting it. The highest risk sexual practice is receptive anal intercourse, due to the relative fragility of rectal tissue. This medication can stop HIV from spreading in the body and help patients maintain their HIV-negative status. PrEP is available in both pill form, which is taken every day, and injection form, of which the first two injections are initiated one month after another while all other injections are initiated every two months.  Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is an antiretroviral drug regimen taken after potential HIV exposure to prevent an HIV-negative individual from converting to HIV-positive status. PEP is only for emergency situations and must be started within 72 hours of exposure – sooner is always better than later – and must be taken for 28 days.  PrEP and PEP are available in many ways, including visiting your primary care provider (PCP) or an urgent care location.   HPV Immunization  All genders and identities can protect themselves against human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that can lead to the risk of cervical, mouth, head, neck, throat, anal, vaginal, penile and vulvar cancers. HPV is so common that nearly all sexually active people, regardless of sexual orientation and practices, will be exposed at some point in their lifetime.  The HPV vaccine (common brands include Gardasil and Cervarix) is a safe and effective method to prevent HPV, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This vaccine protects against infections that can lead to HPV-related cancers and precancers, as well as genital warts. While patients should start receiving the vaccine at 9 years old years old, unvaccinated adults up to the age of 45 can also receive the vaccine through their PCP – better late than never!  STI Testing  Sexually-transmitted infections form from bacteria, viruses or parasites that can be transmitted by person-to-person sexual contact through semen, vaginal, blood and other bodily fluids. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, there are more than 20 million estimated new STI cases across the nation each year.   Luckily, most STIs are preventable. Annual STI testing for HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis is important to stay on top of your sexual health. Because these STIs may sometimes have no symptoms, screening is recommended regularly and with any change in sexual partners. Depending on the specific condition, tests for these infections include urine, swab and blood tests. Speak with your primary care provider on a screening schedule that works best for you.  Prostate Exams  Prostate exams look for early signs of prostate cancer in patients who still have a prostate. The CDC recommends those who are at least 55 years old get regular prostate screenings; however, for patients with a family history of prostate cancer, screenings may be recommended as early as 45 years old.  These exams are done via two common methods – a prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test and a digital rectal examination (DRE). Your provider can help you determine your risk and when you should start getting screened.  Pap Tests and Pelvic Exams  Patients of all genders who have a cervix, uterus, vagina and/or ovaries will benefit from regular pelvic exams and Pap screenings. A pelvic exam consists of a provider looking inside the vagina and at the cervix for anything unusual. A Pap test, also known as a Pap smear, involves your provider using a small, soft swab to collect cervical cells to check for early signs of cancer.  Generally speaking, people with these organs should have a Pap test every three years starting at age 21 through the age of 30. After age 30, patients should receive a Pap test with HPV co-testing every five years until age 65. These recommendations are changing based on new research, so it is important to have a conversation with your PCP about the current guidelines so you can make an informed choice about what schedule you should follow. A gynecologist or your primary care provider can counsel you and perform these screenings.  Mammograms and Breast Exams  People with breast tissue, especially dense breast tissue, are at risk for breast cancer, and regular breast screenings are your best line of defense. At-home breast self-exams are the first step – you will want to check your breasts for any lumps, changes, fluid leaks, irregular tissue thickening or anything else that feels unusual.  The Breast Cancer Risk Assessment tool, provided by the National Cancer Institute, is a good place to start to identify your risk. Talk with your primary care provider about the risks and benefits of starting screening at age 40 so you can make an informed decision about when to start. If you have any family history of breast or ovarian cancer, your PCP will offer you genetic testing for BRCA 1 and 2 mutations. Nevadans over the age of 18 can also get BRCA genetic test for free by enrolling in the Healthy Nevada Project.  Mammograms are important screening tools, but for a significant portion of people with breast tissue, density of the breast tissue may make mammograms less helpful in detecting cancer. Your primary care provider can help you decide what additional imaging (such as breast ultrasound) might be best for you.

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    • Behavioral Health
    • Pediatric Care
    • Primary Care
    • Kid's Health
    • Mental Health

    Nurturing Your Child's Back-to-School Mental Health

    The back-to-school season is here, and ensuring your child's successful transition involves more than just school supplies and schedules. At Renown Children’s Hospital, and in collaboration with Nevada Pediatric Psychiatry Solutions, we understand the vital role that mental health plays in a child's overall well-being and academic performance. Below we'll guide you through essential tips for a smooth back-to-school experience, with a special focus on nurturing your child's mental health. How to Support Your Child’s Mental Health from Home Remember, the below strategies can be adapted to align with your child's personality, learning style and household dynamics. Flexibility and understanding are key in tailoring these tips to suit your child's unique needs. 1. Be Open to Communication: Recognize that effective communication is the cornerstone of understanding your child's feelings and concerns. Create a safe space where your child feels comfortable expressing their thoughts. Listen to learn, without judgment. Make it a point to validate their emotions and ensure they are heard. Encourage sharing experiences,worries, friends and challenges they may be facing. Having open conversations about sensitive topics opens the door for discussion and understanding. Make yourself available. 2. Establish a Routine: A consistent routine can offer a sense of stability and predictability for your child, and anticipation helps to decrease anxiety and establish a sense of control. Join forces and design a daily schedule that includes time for schoolwork, play, physical activity, meals and relaxation. Be flexible about the structure to allow room for last-minute changes including extra activities based on that day’s needs as well. Always add time for play and bonding. 3. Practice Compassion: Back-to-school can come with big emotions. Listening reflexively and acknowledging these feelings can help you and your child act positively on these big emotions. 4. Get Involved: Actively engage in your child's school life by participating in school events, meetings and discussions. Show interest in their educational journey, ask about their experiences and provide guidance when needed. Being present in their academic pursuits not only boosts their confidence but also strengthens the parent-child bond. 5. Use Positive Reinforcement: Celebrate your child's achievements, no matter how small they may seem. This allows for a sense of accomplishment and boosts self-esteem. Praise efforts, progress and perseverance, whether it's completing an assignment, making a new friend or overcoming a challenge. This positivity encourages a growth mindset and resilience. 6. Organize a Schoolwork Zone: Create a comfortable workspace at home dedicated to school-related tasks. Customize the area based on your child's preferences and needs. Having a designated space for studying and completing assignments promotes focus, reduces distractions and enhances their overall learning experience.

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    • Emergency Care
    • Urgent Care
    • Primary Care

    When to Seek Care for Abdominal Pain

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints that brings individuals to the emergency room. We spoke with emergency physician Bret Frey, MD, to ask about when and where to seek care for abdominal pain.   Dr. Frey advises that any time you feel something is developing inside your body that is substantially different from what is normal for you, understand that something is wrong. He further explains that warning signs of an acute medical situation include fever, vomiting or a rapid change in function and ability to move due to pain. These symptoms indicate that one needs to be evaluated by a medical professional.   This evaluation will include the care team conducting an examination and asking a series of questions to determine if additional diagnostics, such as lab work or imaging, are needed. Be prepared to discuss where the pain is and what it feels like, in addition to how long it’s been bothering you and if it’s constant or intermittent.  While appendicitis often comes to mind when thinking about abdominal pain, Dr. Frey says that this is not the bulk of cases that the Emergency Department sees. In fact, often the pain does not have a specific diagnosis, but our team of board-certified emergency physicians are experienced in assessing and caring for those experiencing the acute symptoms he described.   “We often don’t come away with an answer about exactly what it is, but we substantially rule out life threats in a very methodical and systematic way,” said Frey.  The abdomen includes many organs, including the stomach, liver, small and large intestines, gallbladder and pancreas. In addition, pain stemming from your chest, pelvis or back may be felt in the abdominal area.  If you are experiencing abdominal issues that are persistent but not an emergency, talk to your primary care doctor about what you are experiencing, and be prepared to review the history of this pain, medications, allergies and diet. He or she will be a good partner to review conditions such as gas, heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, inflammation or menstrual and ovulation pain. Drinking plenty of water is always an important part of supporting your health.

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    • Primary Care
    • Women's Health

    How to Get Vitamin D on Cloudy Days, and Every Day

    Vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin, is considered a pro-hormone and is synthesized by our bodies when skin is exposed to sunlight. It helps our bodies absorb calcium, build strong bones and teeth, can help ward off osteoporosis and can help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 15%. However, getting the vitamin D you need isn’t quite as simple as soaking up the rays. Vitamin D breaks down quickly, and in the winter – especially in northern latitudes – the sun never gets high enough for UVB rays to penetrate the atmosphere and reach your skin. So how do you get enough vitamin D? We asked Alexandra Westover, APRN for Renown Health, for more information on the topic. "Vitamin D deficiency is found to be linked to multiple health concerns; everything from cancer to depression," says Alexandra. “That said, rates of vitamin D deficiency are high in the U.S. due to various reasons, with the increasing rates of obesity being one factor." Another factor explaining why most Americans are low in vitamin D is that we get very little of our vitamin D from our diet, with most of our vitamin D being produced via exposure to sunlight. However, lounging in the sun for long hours without sunblock isn’t recommend either due to risk for skin cancer, thus, a supplement might not be a bad idea if your doctor is okay with it. "If your vitamin D levels are low, eating high vitamin D foods, such as fatty fish, mushrooms, dairy, eggs and fortified cereals and orange juice, can help, but it typically isn’t enough to correct a deficiency, nor are over-the-counter vitamin D supplements,” said Alexandra. “Most people require a prescription-dose level of vitamin D to correct deficiency." Top 5 Reasons Why You Need Vitamin D Maintains healthy bones and teeth Supports the health of the immune system, brain, and nervous system Regulates insulin levels and aids diabetes management Supports lung function and cardiovascular health Influences the expression of genes involved in cancer development Eating Foods That Are Rich in Vitamin D Fatty fish such as salmon, herring and tuna Fortified milk and orange juice Fortified cereals Eggs Mushrooms Cod Liver Oil

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    • Primary Care
    • Screening

    Why are Annual Exams & Routine Screenings Important?

    March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and we want you to receive the best preventative care possible. Early detection can help prevent serious illness, yet many people still choose to skip their annual exams and routine screenings. Bonnie Ferrara, MD, MPH, Section Chief for Primary Care at Renown Medical Group, further explains the importance of this simple, easy way to stay healthy. Why are annual exams so important? The benefits of early detection and prevention to save lives and reduce the impacts of disease have been proven. These exams are the perfect opportunity to get your health questions answered. “This is your chance to sit down with your provider and talk about your overall health and your family’s health history as well as your concerns for the future,” says Bonnie Ferrara, M.D., family medicine. “It’s the opportunity for your provider to talk with you about your lifestyle, tobacco use, exercise and alcohol use, all of which make a difference in your future longevity.” The annual wellness exam is also an ideal time for most adult patients to discuss health screenings. In addition, these visits are the perfect time to address issues that may not directly relate to a particular medical problem or immediate illness. A good rule of thumb is to schedule these appointments around your birthday each year to make sure you and your provider are both updated on your care. Why would you need an annual exam if you aren’t feeling sick? According to Dr. Ferrara, seeing your care provider when you aren’t sick is one of the best times. “It is better if you try to arrange this visit when you are not feeling ill,” she says. “It is an opportunity to talk about wellness. Not only how to contribute to your wellness but also the changes that you can make that will make huge dividends in the future for your wellness. In addition, it allows us to do some education about what to expect in the coming years as far as your health and lifestyle changes.” What can you expect at an annual exam? Annual exams usually check your: History – lifestyle behaviors, health concerns, vaccination status, family medical history Vitals – blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate and temperature General appearance – your care provider can find out a lot about you just by watching and talking to you Dr. Ferrara adds, “If this is a Medicare annual wellness exam, it is an opportunity to talk to your provider about depression and dementia as well as be tested for those.” You can also leverage your annual exam to speak to your provider about managing your chronic health problems. "As a provider, these visits give us the opportunity to hear how the medications and lifestyle changes we have recommended are working and if you are having problems with these, we have the opportunity to make suggestions of how to do things better for the future," Dr. Ferrara.

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    • Primary Care
    • Urgent Care

    Primary Care vs. Urgent Care vs. The ER

    When seeking medical care, there are several different provider types and options from which to choose. For example, you may have asked yourself a common question: Should I go to my primary care provider, urgent care or the emergency room? Sarah Herbert, APRN with Renown Medical Group – South Carson, provides guidelines to help you easily make this decision. When should you go to the Emergency Room (ER)?  Making a visit to the ER should be reserved for severe symptoms and/or life-threatening conditions, including:  Chest pain Severe shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Weakness or numbness on one side Slurred speech Fainting/loss of consciousness Continuous bleeding or major open wounds Severe allergic reactions  Coughing or throwing up blood Drug or alcohol overdose Sharp pain in lower abdomen Severe dehydration and not responding to nausea medication (needing IV fluids) High fever that does not get better with medicine Serious burns Broken bones/dislocated joints Head trauma Find an Emergency Department Near You If you’re still unsure of where to go for appropriate medical care, it’s best to check with your primary care physician. And remember, for a life-threatening emergency, call 9-1-1 immediately!

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    • Primary Care
    • Behavioral Health

    What is Disordered Drinking?

    An alcohol problem can affect anyone at any age. Many factors, including job stress, genetics or depression, may contribute to the start of disordered drinking.  Drinking alcohol exists on a continuum. For example, if someone feels down in the dumps for some time, it doesn’t mean they are clinically depressed. So if someone goes through a period with above-normal alcohol consumption, it doesn’t necessarily mean they abuse alcohol. Although “alcoholic” and “alcoholism” are common, they are not clinical descriptions. Alcohol use disorder is the preferred term. Symptoms are often mild but can be the start of a more significant problem. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), over 16 million adults live with alcohol use disorder. Symptoms of Alcohol Use Disorder Do you recognize any of the following symptoms in yourself or someone you know? Drinking more or longer than intended Trying to cut down or stop drinking but not able to Having to drink more than you once did to get the same feeling Being annoyed when family members discuss your drinking Regretting your behavior while you were drinking

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    • Primary Care
    • Travel

    Lyme Disease: 3 Things You Should Know

    Approximately 476,000 Americans are diagnosed and treated for Lyme disease every year. Lyme disease is an infection that is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged or “deer” tick. It’s the most common and fastest-growing vector-borne disease in the United States. This bacterial infection, if left untreated, can cause serious pain, fatigue and other crippling symptoms. Keeping an eye out for early signs of Lyme disease, implementing prevention techniques and understanding testing and treatment options can go a long way in maintaining your health. We consulted with Peter O’Reilly, PA-C at Renown Medical Group – South Carson to learn more. 1. Recognizing the Signs of Lyme Disease Lyme disease is extremely easy to misdiagnose, given that most of its early signs and symptoms mimic those of other conditions, such as COVID-19. Common Lyme Disease symptoms include: Fever Chills Joint or muscle pain Swollen glands Extreme fatigue Headache  The primary initial symptom that occurs in about 80 percent of Lyme disease cases is a “bulls-eye” rash that spreads around the site of the tick bite – called “erythema migrans.” Tick bites can be hard to find and not everyone gets the classic bullseye rash, making Lyme disease difficult to self-diagnose. O’Reilly suggests talking to either your primary care doctor or infection doctor as soon as possible if you’re concerned about Lyme disease.

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    • Primary Care
    • Men's Health

    7 Important Vasectomy Questions for Your Doctor

    If you and your partner are looking for a more permanent birth control method, you might consider a vasectomy. Although vasectomies are common, knowledge about them isn’t quite as common or talked about. If you are considering a vasectomy, talking with your primary care doctor is a great way to learn more and start the process. We consulted with Dr. Aurosis Reddy a primary care doctor with Renown Health – South Carson, about key topics to discuss with your doctor when considering a vasectomy. What is a vasectomy? A vasectomy – also called male sterilization – is a form of male birth control that blocks sperm from reaching semen, according to the American Urological Association (AUA). How effective and safe are vasectomies? Vasectomies are one of the most effective methods of birth control with a long-term success rate of over 99%. A vasectomy has been a safe and successful birth control method for many years. More than 500,000 men elect to have vasectomies every year in the U.S., and the number is rising. A vasectomy is also generally a low-risk procedure with a low complication rate ranging between 1-2%. What does the recovery period look like? A vasectomy is typically a quick procedure that takes under thirty minutes and can be performed in an outpatient setting under local anesthesia. Recovery from a vasectomy is also considered relatively easy. After a vasectomy, most can: Resume everyday activities within two to three days Resume normal exercise in one week Start engaging in sexual activity again in one week Your doctor can provide more details on what your individualized recovery process will look like.

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    • Primary Care
    • Public Health
    • Virus

    Monkeypox: A Renown Expert Weighs In

    Renown Health is closely following the national outbreak of the monkeypox virus and urging healthcare providers to be alert for patients with illnesses associated with a rash. In working with the Washoe County Health District (WCHD), Renown is closely monitoring the spread of monkeypox in the community and looking to prevent and reduce the spread of monkeypox. To help to ease worries, we consulted with Paul De Leon, Infection Preventionist at Renown Health. What Exactly is Monkeypox? Monkeypox is a rare viral illness caused by the monkeypox virus — the same family of viruses that causes Smallpox. Although symptoms are similar to Smallpox, monkeypox symptoms are milder and rarely fatal. However, it's important to mention that this virus can be more severe for these susceptible groups: Immunocompromised Pregnant women A fetus or newborn baby Women who are breastfeeding Young children Those with severe skin diseases such as eczema How is Monkeypox Transmitted? The monkeypox virus is not easily transmitted but occurs through sustained person to person close contact with an infected individual. Monkeypox can also be transmitted through direct contact with infectious rash, scabs, or body fluids. Monkeypox can also be spread through prolonged intimate physical contact, such as kissing, cuddling or sex. Lastly, monkeypox can be spread through contaminated linens or bedding. Transmission through respiratory secretions is uncommon but has been reported after prolonged face-to-face contact with symptomatic individuals. In addition, pregnant women can spread the virus to their fetuses through the placenta. Monkeypox Testing If you think you have monkeypox, contact your primary care physician or other medical providers to obtain testing. Notify the provider ahead of time before entering the physical office. Signs & Symptoms This current outbreak of West African monkeypox does not have the typical presentation of classic monkeypox. Symptoms usually appear one to three weeks after infection and include: Pimple-like rash or blisters on the face, inside the mouth, and on other areas of the body, like the hands, feet, chest, genitals, or anus. The rash will go through serval stages, including scabs, before healing and may be painful or itchy. Other symptoms of monkeypox can include: Fever Headache Muscle aches and backache Swollen lymph nodes Chills Exhaustion Respiratory symptoms such as sore throat, nasal congestion, or cough Symptoms of monkeypox may occur before or after a rash with some individuals only report experience a rash. Individuals with monkeypox are infectious once symptoms begin and remain infectious until lesions form scabs, scabs fall off, and a fresh layer of skin forms. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks.

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    • Primary Care
    • Urgent Care
    • Prevention and Wellness

    Make Hydration a Priority for Your Health

    As the temperatures skyrocket and we return to more outdoor activity, one thing is certain: you must hydrate to stay cool, healthy, and functional. But how much water do you need, and what are some easy ways to ensure you are getting enough? Aurosis Reddy, DO a family medicine provider with Renown Medical Group, shares what you need to know.  How Much Water Is Enough?  Experts agree that recommended daily water intake can vary depending on different factors such as your weight, metabolism, location, diet, physical activity, and health. As a rule of thumb, women should aim for a daily fluid intake of 91 ounces, and men should aim for 125 ounces. It is important to listen to your body and recognize when you might need to increase your water intake. For example, if you’re partaking in strenuous exercise, or spending time outside in the heat, you’ll want to give your body more water and electrolytes to function properly.  How Can I Tell If I Am Dehydrated? Decreased coordination Fatigue Less urination Dizziness Dry, sticky lips and mouth Increased thirst Headache

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